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The 57th United States presidential election has once again predictably narrowed down to only two realistic presidential candidates: the incumbent, President Barack Obama for the Democrats, and Gov. Mitt Romney, for the Republicans. Accordingly, we've compiled the most comprehensive database of their positions on all the topics and all the issues to assist you, the electorate, in casting your vote on November 6. Just scroll down below the introductions and click one of the 29 issues and 12 profile categories to compare the political stances and biographical data of 2012 Presidential Candidates.



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2012 Republican Presidential Nominee

Former Governor of Massachusetts
Mitt Romney

Romney's profile and positions on the issues



Romney On LGBT

Romney’s position on the issue of LGBT has undergone an evolution over the course of his 18-year political career, reflecting his personal struggle over the issue – although, for the record, he insists that his stance has always been the same, and cites the changing definition of the term ‘gay rights’ as the source of the misconception.

He was supportive of the LGBT movement’s cause early in his political career, especially during his campaign for the Massachusetts Senate seat in 1994. Following a meeting with the local chapter of the Log Cabin Club, which is the only pro-LGBT Republican organization of note in the country, Romney wrote to the club members’ to reaffirm his commitment to their cause ( original letter ).
“I am pleased to have had an opportunity to talk with you and to meet many of you personally during your September meeting. I learned a great deal from those discussions and many thoughtful questions you posed. As a result of our discussions and other interactions with gay and lesbian voters across the state, I am more convinced than ever before that as we seek to establish full equality for America's gay and lesbian citizens, I will provide more effective leadership than my opponent.

I am not unaware of my opponents considerable record in the area of civil rights, or the commitment of Massachusetts voters to the principle of equality for all Americans. For some voters it might be enough for me to simply match my opponent's record in this area. But I believe we can and must do better. If we are to achieve the goals we share, we must make equality for gays and lesbians a mainstream concern. My opponent cannot do this. I can and will.”
In an appearance on Piers Morgan Tonight last year, Romney outlined his views on the subject, making a clear distinction between his faith and politics.
Morgan : What is the gay right that you’re in favor of?
Romney : Equal rights in employment, equal rights in, I mean, for instance, as the Governor, I had members of my team that were gay. I appointed a couple of judges who apparently I find out were gay. Look, I didn’t ask people their sexual orientation
Morgan : Does your faith mean that you view homosexuality as a sin?
Romney : I separate quite distinctly matters of personal faith from the leadership that one has in a political sense.
Morgan : Can you do that?
Romney : Absolutely.
Morgan : Seriously?
Romney : You don’t begin to apply the doctrine of religion to responsibility for guiding a nation or guiding a state.
Morgan : But what is the Mormon position on homosexuality being a sin?
Romney : You know, that’s something you can take up with the church. I’m not a spokesman for my church. I’m not a spokesman for my church, and one thing I’m not gonna do in running for president is become a spokesman for my church, or apply a religious test which simply is forbidden by the constitution. I’m not going there.
June 7, 2011: Romney on Piers Morgan Tonight



Romney on Marriage

Against
I agree with 3,000 years of recorded history. I disagree with the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts. Marriage is an institution between a man and a woman. I will support an amendment to the Massachusetts constitution to make that expressly clear. Of course, basic civil rights, and certain appropriate benefits should be available to people in non-traditional relationships. But marriage is a special institution between a man and a woman, and our Constitution and laws should reflect that.
November 18, 2003: Romney’s statement as Governor of Massachusetts, reacting to the Supreme Judicial Court’s ruling that same-sex marriage is protected in the Massachusetts Constitution.

 



Romney on Civil Unions<
From day one I've opposed the move for same-sex marriage and its equivalent, civil unions
February 21, 2005: Speaking at a Republican rally in South Carolina Republicans
Chris Matthews: Do you think there's any difference, really, between a gay marriage and something called a civil union?
Mitt Romney: Well, I would rather have neither, to tell you the truth. I'd rather that domestic partner benefits, such as hospital - hospital visitation rights for same-sex couples. I don't want civil unions or gay marriage. But there is a difference, even when just the word is the difference.And the difference is that, if you indicate as a society that you're indifferent between a same-sex couple marrying and a heterosexual couple marrying, then it means our schools and other institutions are going to have to indicate that there is no difference whatsoever, and that obviously has societal consequences that are important.
26 August, 2005: Hardball with Chris Matthews

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Romney on DADT (Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell)

Question: How do you feel about gays serving openly in the military.
Romney on DADT (Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell)
Question: How do you feel about gays serving openly in the military.
Romney: That’s already occurred and I’m not planning on reversing that at this stage. <
Question: But you’re comfortable with it?
Romney: I was not comfortable making the change during a period of conflict, by virtue of the complicating the features of a new program in the middle of two wars going on, but those wars are winding down and moving to that direction at this stage no longer presents that problem.
November 9, 2011: Romney meeting with the editorial board of the Des Moines Register.



Romney on ‘Defense of Marriage Act’
The actions that I take as president depends on part on the state of play in Washington, the people that are there and what options exists - but certainly I would defend the Defense of Marriage Act which the current president has refused to defend. I believe that the Defense of Marriage Act was well constructed and should be maintained.
November 9, 2011: Romney meeting with the editorial board of the Des Moines Register.



2012 Libertarian Presidential Nominee

Former Governor of New Mexico
Gary Johnson

Johnson's profile and positions on the issues



Johnson on LGBT

Johnson is a supporter of gay rights, arguing that ‘it’s freedom, it’s liberty’ and that the government has no right to intrude on the personal lives of Americans.

Stephanie Condon: I know that you’re in favor of gay rights. Do you think this is an inevitability for the Republican Party to take that stance or do you think there’ll be more friction?

Gary Johnson: Well, it’s freedom, it’s liberty, and it’s the – how many times have you heard Republicans talk about ‘I believe in freedom’, ‘I believe in liberty’, and ‘I believe in the personal responsibility that goes along with that’? Well, in my estimations, that is what we should be believing in and espousing.”

February 11, 2011: Johnson speaking with CBSNews’ Stephanie Condon





Johnson on Marriage and Civil Unions

“Rick Santorum’s position is unconstitutional. The Constitution requires that all citizens be treated equally and makes no reference to gender in assuring those equal rights… By any fair measure, equal access to marriage for all Americans is a right - guaranteed by the Constitution. Senator Santorum’s claim that legally recognizing gay marriage would be no different than legalizing polygamy, child molestation or bestiality is repugnant and insulting to millions of gay Americans.”
January 9, 2012, Press Release: Gov. Gary Johnson Assails Santorum and Obama on Gay Marriage

“I support gay unions. I think the government ought to get out of the marriage business.”
April 22, 2011: Johnson on ABC News’ Topline

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“Certainly, religions and people of various faiths have the right to view marriage as they wish, and sanction marriage according to those beliefs. Just as government shouldn’t interfere with individual rights, government should not interfere with how marriage is treated as a ceremony, a sacrament or a privilege within a set of religious beliefs. However, when it comes to the rights of individuals and couples under the law, government’s promise should be to insure equal access to those rights to all Americans, gay or straight.

For a very long time, society has viewed gay marriage as a moral and, yes, religious issue. Today, I believe we have arrived at a point in history where more and more Americans are viewing it as a question of liberty and freedom. That evolution is important, and the time has come for us to align our marriage laws with the notion that every individual should be treated equally.”

December 1, 2011: Johnson speaking during an on-line GOProud Town Hall meeting



Johnson on DADT (Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell)

“The Pentagon’s certification for the implementation of the repeal of DADT is good news - but long overdue... It should not have taken endless study and hand wringing for the United States to join many other nations in recognizing that our military need not discriminate against openly gay service men and women.

DADT is just one more example of the federal government trying to dictate the private lives of free people. It’s repeal is progress, but we have much more to do to get the government out of the business of discriminating on the basis of personal choices and lifestyles.

As I have stated before if the Republican Party is going to capture the White House in 2012 we need to be the party that promotes freedom from government intervention into our personal lives. Those who continue to promote discrimination and bigotry within the Republican Party in an attempt to pander to social conservatives will cost us the general election. Not only should Republicans be the party of efficient management of the pocket book, but we need to be the party of personal liberty and personal freedom.”

July 22, 2011, Press Release: Presidential Candidate Gary Johnson calls DADT certification “good news – but long overdue”



Johnson on DOMA (Defense of Marriage Act)

Johnson opposes DOMA.

“As a believer in individual freedom and keeping government out of personal lives, I simply cannot find a legitimate justification for federal laws, such as the Defense of Marriage Act, which ‘define’ marriage. That definition should be left to religions and individuals – not government. Government’s role when it comes to marriage is one of granting benefits and rights to couples who choose to enter into a marriage ‘contract’. As I have examined this issue, consulted with folks on all sides, and viewed it through the lens of individual freedom and equal rights, it has become clear to me that denying those rights and benefits to gay couples is discrimination, plain and simple.”
December 1, 2011: Johnson speaking during an on-line GOProud Town Hall meeting




Romney and Johnson Issue Comparisons

   Abortion   Afghanistan   Budget   Business & Labor   Capital Punishment   China   Civil Liberties   Cuba   Economy   Education
   Foreign Affairs    Guantanamo   Gun Control   Health Care   Immigration    Marijuana   
   Minimum Wage
   Same Sex       
   Social Security         


Romney vs Johnson Profile Comparisons

  Age & Birthdate   Ancestry   Career   Childhood   Children   Education    Parents   Religion   Siblings   Spouses 


2016 Presidential Election



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